Securing Yourself from Cyber Breaches


We can’t deny the fact that every year, technology keeps on improving and sometimes, it makes people worry about their privacy. There are literally spy gadgets today that can be bought easily from online stores such as https://ishotify.com/best-alarm-clock-spy-camera/. Then again, depending on the purpose and application of the device, it can do good or harm towards the person.

However, don’t you know that the government is actually keeping close tabs on its citizen? In fact, the ACLU mentioned that the government is way slicker and move smoother than what you think they are. Suspecting that you are being spied on? Here are few of the bizarre things that you need to be vigilant about!

Is Owning a Smart TV really a Smart Purchase?

While it seems so cool to own the latest “smart” tech, it is somewhat compromising your privacy in one way or the other. According to reports of USA Today, WikiLeaks unveiled that the CIA could break into smart TVs, with special mention to Samsung. You might expect that this break-in to be feasible on your computer or phone, but this new information is just worrisome.

Samsung responded that it’s their top priority to protect consumer’s security and privacy and thus, looking for solutions in this matter urgently.

You have not Updated Your Devices

According to Michael Kaiser of National Cyber Security Alliance, consumers need to take care of their basic cyber security measures. Among the best ways of avoiding breaches is by keeping updating your devices on a regular basis. This is due to the reason that outdated software has higher chances of being compromised.

A good example of this is the incident that happened in 2015 when it discovered that 95 percent of Android devices are hackable using a single text message. This was experienced by Apple and immediately rolled out an update to resolve the issue.

It’s not the Cookies that You Think

The small bits of information stored in your web browser are used for tracking your online activities. These cookies do hold vital information from your password, recent searches from search engines to even something you’ve bought online. The downside with these cookies is that, they enter massive database where companies could find out about your offline identity and sell the info to third-party.